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Should cursive be taught in school?

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Gail Baumbach
December 05, 2019 8:59PM

Personally, I think it’s a good thing that cursive was phased out. Replacing it with a more practical skill like typing makes a lot of sense.

However, this opens up the argument that many things taught in school are not exactly practical and could be eliminated with the ubiquity of modern technologies. Why learn basic math when we have calculators? For that matter, why learn anything when we can Google everything? It’s a slippery slope to eliminate every skill that doesn’t fall into the practical category, and I think there is something to be said for learning for the sake of learning.

That being said, many people feel like much of a child’s current curriculum will not prepare them for “real life.” There are only so many hours in a school day, so is there more value in learning how to do your own taxes versus advanced calculus? Overall, I think it’s important to have a good balance of practicality and creativity in education.

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CALEB MASTERSON
December 10, 2019 1:06AM
I am in sixth grade and I went to a private shcool in third grade. They taught us cursive their and my handwriting is way better in cursive. I think YES!!!!!
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christiwll
December 11, 2019 9:30AM
Yes, absolutely! I would consider it a trgedy if any American child stood before the Declaration of Independence or the U.S. Constitution and did not know what they said.
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Susanna Prescott
December 11, 2019 4:01PM
Yes, because to sign legal docs you have to use your signture.
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Nigel B Lemaire
December 10, 2019 10:58PM
Absolutely. Sooner or later in your life you will have to sign legal documents (mortgage loan papers, etc). What are you gonna do make an "X"? LOL
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LazerWolf
December 11, 2019 11:34PM
I dont think so because it is the same as normal writing and it doesnt give you any advantages besides being able to read it. It also wont hurt you later in life because I know people who live great lives who dontknow how to read or write cursive. And oersonally I havent touched it since Ive learnt it.
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Trinity Bell
December 11, 2019 12:43AM
It is my personal opinion that cursive should be taught in school. When signing legal documents and everyday items like reciets, you have to sign your name in cursive. You may not always use cursive every day, but it is a good skill to have whenever you need it.
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D
December 11, 2019 2:09AM
I feel like its a waste of time, however, my handwriting is some hybrid of cursive and regular handwriting, as well as my legal signature, so it helps people have their own unique handwriting.
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Nicklaus Stephen Hoffer
December 11, 2019 4:00PM
yes
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Derek Lin
December 12, 2019 12:44AM
no
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Zoey Arnold
December 16, 2019 8:54PM
No, cursive is not practical since you can write normally and it will just look different.
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Marley Washington
December 17, 2019 1:42AM
yes coase its part of learning
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Mark Beck
December 11, 2019 5:49PM
no... It's rarely used in the common world... onl time It's used is in signatures
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Serenity Huskins
December 17, 2019 2:45AM
Spelt by wrong, my bad. Plus, 8th grade is HARD.
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Jeromy Holste
December 10, 2019 2:48PM
naw man it's useless
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Tevin Son
December 12, 2019 3:10AM
No, there is no freaking point and I can't even remeber anything I learned about cursive.
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LIL Worm
December 13, 2019 1:57PM
Your sigture is your own way that cant be re done with out your own touch the reason you sign a doc is if anythings was to happen they (police) can see if it was fordged
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Makayla Wade
December 13, 2019 1:51PM
Yes, for your signature.
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Cavejoncen
December 13, 2019 4:25AM
NO...
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peterc5
December 13, 2019 2:32AM
Yes it should, for various reasons, some of which are outlined below. Part of a recognised and proven way of learning and remembering content is to combine certain physical methods to facilitate the parts of the brain that store memories. By listening to, and/or seeing visual content, then writing a synopsis of that content on paper, the learning process is reinforced. When the batteries run out in your electronics, or you don't have them at hand, writing notes by hand is the best way to go, and cursive is faster than printing. You will also develop your own handwriting style that suits you. Just keep a small notebook & pen at hand! Learning cursive assists in essential hand-eye cordination, reinforcing the muscle memory for delicate tasks beyond just handwriting, it can also promote neatness, which also may extend beyond handwriting. Not so long ago, many documents were handwritten and a knowledge of cursive handwriting is essential to be able to read them. I'm sure I could think of many more reasons to learn cursive handwriting, but these will do for now.
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Princess Jazmyne
December 13, 2019 1:10AM
absolutely with the way its becoming more useful. i wish they cared more about teaching it in my school
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Paul Rivera
December 13, 2019 12:23AM
Yes because its imopportant to know how to sign a letter.
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Madison Redd
December 19, 2019 3:26AM
In my district when you are in thirsd grade you are taught how to right in cursive. Once you learn how to write in cursive, instead of the ABC hanging on the walls of classrooms there are cursive letters.
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Dot Miller
December 12, 2019 3:31AM
Absolutely! How else are children supposed to learn how to sign their names or read documents or letters written in cursive? (There are certainly jobs that can require one to be able to read cursive, such as title examination or examination of wills, etc.) So the answer is definitely YES!
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Kaylisa Davis-phillips
December 09, 2019 10:23PM
Yes I wish it is
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Annika Eduardo
December 12, 2019 1:31AM
Yes beacuse they will need to know how to do it when they get older
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Susanna Prescott
December 11, 2019 3:56PM
Yes, I think cursive should be taught in schools because cursive is faster than regular writing and it is neater.
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Kim Charbneau
December 09, 2019 11:13PM
Yes, definitely. I learned it in second grade and still use it today when signing papers for any large purchose such as a car, house, or paper work for medical forms, school forms for the kids, everything. Kids won't be able to read letters that their grandparents may have written long ago. It's an art.
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Hailey Busch
December 11, 2019 11:30PM
Yes
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Upama Malo
December 11, 2019 10:34PM
Yes and No. Yes, because you need to know cursive to sign documents, and because there is a lot of history behind cursive, for example, most of my family history is cursive so your's might be too but cursive is pretty hard to read if you can't write it so you might not understand it and all of the history/histories behind it will fade away. No, because Cursive is really hard to write and their other things that are more useful than cursive, also you can't really use cursive anywhere else than when signing documents because I know for a fact that if I write cursive on the board in front of my classmates when I present they won't understand. Also if I write in cursive in an ELA test I should be prepared to see a big fat 0. That is because some people don't understand cursive because cursive is really hard to read and most of the time you won't know how to read cursive unless you know how to write it. (This is not for some people though It is just most of the time)
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Tobias Riddle
December 11, 2019 6:07PM
Yes
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Alivia’s_random_vlogs
December 13, 2019 11:39PM
yesss
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Hype Bros
December 10, 2019 3:03PM
I think it depends on the student
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Jeremy C XD
December 11, 2019 5:28PM
cursive should not
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Dominique
December 10, 2019 5:59PM
Well, I don't really think there's much you can do with cursive writing. I mean yeah, it makes your handwriting pretty, but it's not like not being able to write in cursive is going to negatively affect you in the future. Most people talk about how certain stuff they learn in school is useless to them later on in life, but at least it helps to develop your mind. You're not really gaining any extra knowledge from writing in cursive. So because of these reasons, I say no.
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Aportey
December 13, 2019 7:39PM
I mean.... is it that usefull in later life? i think not devenitly
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Nia Gaskins
December 19, 2019 3:27PM
Yes, it is one of the things that we need in life to be very succesful because you need to sign things and they do not want you to print.
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UnspeakableNoob
December 14, 2019 1:37AM
Yes because people need to know how to write in cursive it looks better and a faster way of writing
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Ally Cunningham
December 17, 2019 4:22PM
no
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Anihja Clark
December 16, 2019 3:34AM
Yes, We had to do a project in art righting are names in cursive and i didn't know how and im in 6th grade come on now
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Becca Slocombe
December 16, 2019 3:51PM
I think cursive should be taught at school because it makes peoples writing more neat. If you are in primary school then you might get a pen licence and not have to write in pencil anymore!
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Matilda Ward
December 16, 2019 6:16PM
Yes, it will teach children how to neatly present their work, which becomes a HUGE neccesity for university and adult life.
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TRISHA PARIMAL
December 14, 2019 4:27AM
Yes
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Sandra McIntyre
December 17, 2019 7:18AM
Yes. It improves hand-eye coordination, and makes it more difficult for others to forge your signature.
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Delilah Flautt
December 17, 2019 1:08PM
yes
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GODowned
December 17, 2019 6:12PM
Most definitely! The biological and psychological benefits of this skill are necessary for child development. Studies have shown that key principles of learning and memory are embedded in learning to hand write. There is something activated in the brain with all those loops and swirls getting connected.
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Garfield Heslop
December 15, 2019 11:32PM
yes it calms your mind like meditation
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Manae
December 17, 2019 6:13PM
Nope,Its not pactical. Instead of wasting time on it , how about teaching typing or basic coding.When those student enter universites or proffesional life ,with a faster typing speed less time would be wasted.In professional life do we use handwriting ?No we only type!!
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Mark Guerin
December 17, 2019 6:29PM
Yes!! Everyone should know how to write
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Kamiko Dent
December 17, 2019 6:49PM
Yes because it can help later on in life with signitures.
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Harlan Ellison
December 17, 2019 7:57PM
Everyone should know how to write in cursive. It's not like suddenly kids can't learn as much. If I had kids, I would teach them cursive at home. It could be their own secret language nobody else knows how to decipher.
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Mahlet kifle
December 18, 2019 1:52AM
Yes because it makes kids know that one day when they go to thw goverment they'll have some signature ready and they can use different fonts
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Bob Ross
December 19, 2019 2:37AM
nah a big waste of time at my school we spent a month on it and never spoke of it again
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Sophia Worden
December 16, 2019 12:44AM
Yes, I was taught cursive in Kindergarden, and im currently a freshman in highschool. My teachers prefer to grade work they can grade , and my cursive is wayyy neater tahn my print. Also, you will need to learn cursive to sign legal documents, such as morgages and loans.
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ayaan imran
December 13, 2019 12:03AM
yes
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James Huang
December 15, 2019 6:49AM
yes because it is adult writing
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sadafzahra59@hotmail.com
December 14, 2019 11:54PM
Yea cuz most people nowadays do it.
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Alexia Dick
December 14, 2019 3:03PM
I believe that cursive should be taught in school. The bad thing is that they teach cursive at such a young age, then don't you don't use it till Jr High/ High school, so most people forget how to write in cursive. If they kept up with cursive practice all through elementary, I know I would be able to write more than my name and a few other words in cursive.
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Aislinn Barnett
December 14, 2019 3:45PM
yes
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Karsten Reimer
December 14, 2019 11:08PM
Absolutely. I'm probably one of the only students in my school board (OCDSB) who know cursive.
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James Huang
December 14, 2019 11:30PM
yes
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Roxana Darnell
December 15, 2019 1:27AM
Yes, clear script is still necessary to maintain a job and communicate via note.
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Adrian Douglas
December 12, 2019 7:11PM
yes because some kids cant even sigh there name on a check or a there drivers lisence .
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Michael Martin
December 12, 2019 2:42AM
I feel that it is absolutely critical that there be a broader conversation in the development of curriculum not only for the 'practical' value of a skill, which is transient to culture values, but for the developmental value of skill training and education on a neurophysiological level. It is absolutely imperative that a revision of educational curriculum be evaluated in light of modern developmental biology and not purely in light of market projection for job availability. I would much rather see a society of competent, healthy, intelligent, and adaptable human beings capable of learning than to see an army of trained employees. Cursive is a primary example of this. The training of classical methods of writing have developed over a long period of experimentation and selection, formatting the mind in a particular way. This is demonstrated with classical music training in neuroscience. The neurological configuration of classical piano is recognizeable by brain scan without knowing previously if that person was trained in music or not. The extensiblity of this principle has been demonstrated in other instances of language and tool use. It more broadly can be taken to understand that education and experience, or practice with a tool, methodology, or practice, formats and conditions the physical central nervous system. (See research by Nina Kraus on language, music, and the brain, her studies regarding the development and structure of brainstem nerve networks is incredible, here is a video lecture on some of her research: Nina Kraus: Music and Language - A Brain Partnership) With this understanding in mind we can look at the value of learning cursive as actually learning to see the world through the eyes of those who have learned and developed that skill before us. To have insight into the understandings of the past we must adopt the practices of the past and build upon them. If we read the writings of those who wrote, and most importantly, thought through cursive writing in pen and ink without understanding those skills then we lack a certain vocabulary and context for the pace, structure, and beauty of articulation that their thoughts have. Language is one of the foundational skills and tools of being human and written language and music are possibly, still, the most profound technologies that humans have next to mathematics and computation, both of which are systems of symbolic representation that build upon this skill. The value of literacy in learning can almost never be understated. The ability to acquire those skills which enable further and future learning in an organized process which refines and improves skill and understanding is an essential foundation of education. (See the Englebart Institute for bootstrapping humanity's potential, he was the inventor of the computer mouse, monitor, and GUI, he is an iconclast of human and American innovation, thought, and potential of the 21st century, I can’t recommend him enough) Literacy is also one of the areas that America falls behind in. America tails the world in literacy, numeracy, financial literacy, and computer literacy, despite being the most powerful and wealthiest nations for the last century. This is untenable. Correcting it begins with mathematics, language, and music education in the schools, in the home, and in one’s self. I strongly encourage all students to be infinitely curious of the world around you. Listen to and learn from but never settle for the understandings of others. Explore, know, and see for yourself what something is and communicate that understanding. Philosophy, epistemology, gnosis, and communicating that understanding with another are some of the most beautiful experiences in life. To know a thing, one’s self, or another, is an experience I wish upon everyone. I wholeheartedly agree that the unexamined life is not worth living. To practice cursive is not simply to 'write' or to make shapes with letters, it is learning to listen to the minds, experiences, and cultures of all those who came before you and glimpse into the world which they found beautiful, enigmatic, perplexing, revelatory, and meaningful. It takes time to write something with elegance and practiced form. It takes considerable conditioning to understand what beautiful script, sentence, form, and thought are. It takes even more time to be able to produce elegant works. It is an art. Do not rob children of the opportunity for beauty and meaning in life. This is not a matter of talent. It is not a matter of gifts. Writing is not something only for poets and philosophers. It is used by everyone everyday in our society and holds the potential to enrich anyone’s life. It is a matter of curiosity, of beauty, of appreciation, and of patience. It is not just a skill, it is an investment of value in their very capacity for knowledge, learning, and beauty.
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maclikestodab
December 09, 2019 11:57PM
It isn't commonly used, but I think it is a good idea for kids to be taught cursive. I use cursive in my signature, and also it is generally good for kids to know how to write in cursive, since some kids may find their handwriting is neater while writing in cursive.
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Stonedog Stoneface
December 16, 2019 12:16AM
No. Along with other things you shouldn't be taught in school. They should teach you everything that's here now up until 6th grade, then depending on what you wish to be, to have a personalized learining curriculum. A man wishing to be a plumber doesn't want or need to learn calculus.
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Rollandus Lemans
December 10, 2019 4:13AM
I think it would definitely be a good idea. It isn't something that is necessarily used as much nowadays, but it college it definitely helps with taking fast (and effective) notes.
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Mina Lee
December 10, 2019 10:12AM
yes'
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Lamb Gaming
December 10, 2019 5:13PM
No
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Anson lin
December 13, 2019 1:02AM
I am not sure because that I learn cursive in grade 3 now I am in 5th grade and I don't learn it now so I think NO .
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Mike epicness
December 10, 2019 11:37PM
I think no because we want to choose.
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Nick Gamer
December 12, 2019 6:52PM
nien
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Kisimi Williams
December 17, 2019 1:15AM
yes I do think cursive should be taught in school because when the kids grow up and they a signature you typically put a cursive signing
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Serenity Huskins
December 17, 2019 2:43AM
Buy not being able to read it is an advantage in English! My teacher just gave up and checks my work for completion. I actually do the work, but the teacher is to lazy to even try to read it.
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Shant Melkonian
December 17, 2019 2:28AM
No, I think that it should be taught during Caligraphy classes (((φ(◎ロ◎;)φ)))
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Helena Chiu
December 11, 2019 7:18AM
You should be taught cusive because if you ever want to write in cursive you won't know how to do it. But if you do know how to write in cursive then you're lucky that if you have to write a letter in cursive then so could do it fast and easily!
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Serenity Huskins
December 17, 2019 2:32AM
I love writing in cursive because it makes it harder for teachers to read your work. Then, they just grade it for completion! :)
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Sandra Q Woosley
December 11, 2019 4:29PM
Well, YES. For one thing you have to sign your name when getting a passport. My husbands signature is more like printing and it wan't accepted. Things taught in school develop motor skills and brain function. Otherwise we would just be kin to a robot. And what if one day you found yourself w/o a computer, calculator or any technology? It could happen.
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michaela9
December 12, 2019 3:20PM
It is a very practical skill to have but it could be replaced with typing class.
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Reba Beres
December 12, 2019 10:51PM
yes becauselater in life you will have to sign important things.
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Jason Wyckoff
December 12, 2019 10:58PM
yes
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Hayden Morrison
December 12, 2019 7:44PM
i to am in 6th grade and i went to private school for 1 through 4 and they tought cursive. plus my dad is a collage professer and writes in cursive on the board and a lot of 20 year old students cant read his speech and fail.
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Patrick Juricek
December 18, 2019 7:19PM
everyone who thinks it should be taught in schoolks is dumb
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Jordan Pinckney
December 09, 2019 8:02PM
it Should. but schools stop doing so because they don't want us to know cursivelike if theydecide to change something on the decleration of independance they could.
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disisme
December 16, 2019 10:30PM
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! ur signature can legaly be whatever u want (i tink) der is no use if u wanna use cursive learn it on ur own don put us kids through it!!!!!!!!!
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Amy Gaming
December 12, 2019 3:55PM
yes, because kids wil be able to be writing faster than adults... I WHAT MEH WRITING!!!!
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Sammy Chebab
December 10, 2019 9:01PM
'cause, yo' gonna be stupid like a baby or not??
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Leonore E. Conklin
December 10, 2019 12:27AM
If anyone later on in life would like to read certain books that are in cursive I suggest we do. If you wish to keep them stupid then NO.
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grace plays
December 10, 2019 12:24AM
yes i learned it in grade 2
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maryam darkal
December 12, 2019 1:42AM
yes
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Lee Strutzel
December 15, 2019 5:45AM
I'm oh so sorry but do let me ask a question: what would you spend time teaching INSTEAD of cursive? Not only is it patriotic, but also an artform. Considering a document isn't official until it's signed via PEN, what are we teaching kids? Electronic signatures are a thing of the future, but are you really telling kids it's okay to let go of the past? The founding fathers of this country would be INCREDIBLY dissapointed. Oh and plus, it looks better than handwriting, just saying. -Lee
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Ricardo Alonzo-Jaimez
December 09, 2019 11:00PM
yalll dumb
广东11选5